What To Do About Metallic Taste in Coffee? [10 Ways to Fix It]

We all know that coffee is a delicious way to start the day. But what if you start to notice a metallic taste in your coffee?

This can be a sign that there is something wrong with your brewing process, and it’s important to figure out what’s causing the taste so you can fix it.

In this blog post, we’ll explore some of the possible causes of a metallic taste in coffee and offer some solutions for how to get rid of it.

Keep reading to learn more.

Causes of Metallic Taste in Coffee

Coffee is a morning staple for many people, but that morning cup of joe can sometimes come with an unwelcome metallic taste. So what’s causing it? And more importantly, how can you make sure your coffee tastes great every time?

1. Metal Contaminated Water

Water is the main ingredient in coffee, so any contaminants present in the water can easily affect the taste of your coffee. This includes metals like copper or lead, which are known to produce a metallic taste. If you see reddish-brown stains on fixtures near the waterline of your coffee maker, you know that there is a high concentration of metals in your water supply.

2. Old Coffee Makers

If you’ve had your coffee maker for several years and never replaced any parts, it may be time to start thinking about replacing the filter and other components. Eventually, metal parts like these can corrode or break down, which can lead to a metallic taste in your coffee.

3. Burnt Coffee Beans

If you recently switched to pre-ground beans, this may be the cause of your metallic-tasting coffee. When coffee beans are ground up, they start releasing compounds that change their flavor profile and create bitterness. If you’re using pre-ground coffee, your beans may have been ground too long ago and are now producing a burnt flavor. Try switching to whole bean coffee instead.

4. Incorrect Water Temperature

The optimal water temperature for brewing coffee is between 195 degrees Fahrenheit and 205 degrees Fahrenheit (90°C to 96°C). If the water is too hot or too cold, it can affect the flavor of your coffee. Coffee tends to have a metallic taste when brewed with water that is too hot or boiling.

5. Incorrect Grind Setting

If you’re trying to brew a coarse grind in a fine-grind machine or vice versa, this can also result in a metallic taste. If you don’t have the right settings, coffee particles may not release from your filter and give you that same great taste.

6. Too Much Coffee in the Filter

Skipping a step when brewing can lead to a metallic taste in your coffee. For example, if you put too much coffee in your coffee maker’s filter or don’t use enough water here, this can affect the flavor of your brew and make it taste metallic

Fixing Metallic Taste in Coffee

Now that you know some of the causes of a metallic taste in your coffee, let’s take a look at how to fix it:

1. Use High-Quality Water

To get rid of any metal particles from your water supply, you’ll need to have one going through a purification process before being used for coffee preparation. This includes using filtered water or bottled spring water once the initial contaminants have been removed.

2. Replace Your Coffee Maker’s Parts

If you’ve noticed reddish-brown stains on fixtures near the waterline of your coffee maker, it means there is a high concentration of metals in your water supply and you should replace those components as soon as possible to prevent further buildup from happening. You can also take apart your machine’s filter basket and soak all the parts in white vinegar for about an hour. This will help loosen up any buildup on the filter, which may be causing your metallic taste.

3. Grind Your Own Beans

If you’ve been grinding your own beans, but are now starting to notice a metallic taste, that could mean you’ve ground them for too long. Try grinding your own coffee with a coarse setting, which should give you the best results.

4. Temperature Matters

The optimal water temperature for brewing is between 195 degrees Fahrenheit and 205 degrees Fahrenheit (90°C to 96°C). Avoid using boiling water or ice-cold water when preparing your coffee drink. If you are using hot tap water, let it sit for a few minutes before brewing. This will allow the heat to dissipate a bit and give your coffee a better flavor.

5. Use the Proper Grind Setting

Be sure that you’re using the proper grind setting when preparing your coffee drinks to keep from over extracting them and getting an unwanted metallic taste in your cup of joe.

6. Switch from Pre-Ground to Whole Beans

If you have been brewing with pre-ground beans and are noticing a metallic taste in your coffee, it could be due to the fact that these beans have already lost much of their flavor. Instead, switch over to whole bean coffee in order to get a more robust flavor in your every cup.

7. Drink Coffee in Moderation

Too much of a good thing can have its downfalls, especially when it comes to coffee. Limit the amount of coffee you drink per day so you don’t get sick of it . For example, limit yourself to one or two cups in the morning instead of drinking four or five throughout the day.

8. Use Milk and Sugar as a Fix

If you’ve been noticing a metallic taste in your coffee due to using tap water, try adding a splash of milk or sugar to mask the taste. If you normally drink black coffee with no additives, this is an easy way to balance your brew without compromising your beverage’s flavor.

9. Clean Your Machine Regularly

Trying to brew the perfect cup of coffee every time? Make sure your machine is cleaned regularly. This keeps it running smoothly and tasting great. To clean your coffee maker, use white vinegar with water (50/50 ratio) or run one cycle with undiluted white vinegar through the machine, which will remove any residue buildup. Afterward, run one cycle with water to rinse out the vinegar.

10. Know When to Replace Your Machine

If you have tried all of the above suggestions and are still noticing a metallic taste in your coffee, it may be time to replace your machine. Try looking into different models that use charcoal or gold-plated filters that help remove any impurities in the water.

11. Get Rid of Your Metallic Taste for Good

If you’re still concerned about your taste in coffee, try drinking it with milk and sugar to mask the metallic taste . If this doesn’t seem to be working, consider adding some flavored syrup to your morning cup to give it a sweeter taste.

What does the metallic taste in mouth mean?

When your mouth tastes metallic, it’s usually a sign that there is something wrong. In most cases, this taste is caused by an underlying condition that requires treatment.

It is an unpleasant feeling that can also be caused by a number of things, from dental problems to nutritional deficiencies.

So, if you’re experiencing a metallic taste in your mouth, it’s important to see a doctor to determine the cause.

Here are just a few of the things that can cause a metallic taste in your mouth.

Infections and Diseases – An infection can be caused by a number of different things, from bacteria to viruses. Some infections that can cause a metallic taste in the mouth include cold, flu, or oral thrush.

Nutritional Deficiencies – There are a variety of vitamins and minerals that can cause a metallic taste, including zinc, iron, vitamin D, magnesium, and vitamin B12.

Dental Problems – Tooth decay, plaque buildup, and cavities can all lead to a metallic taste in your mouth.

Medications – Certain medications, such as antibiotics and diuretics, may cause side effects like a metallic taste in the mouth or bad breath.

Other Factors – Some other causes of a metallic taste in the mouth include alcohol, smoking, pregnancy, and diabetes.

So, if your tongue tastes metallic or you have a bad taste in your mouth that won’t go away it is best to see a doctor to find out what’s going on.

Final Thoughts

For most people, the metallic taste in their mouth is due to something that can easily be fixed, so it’s important not to ignore the problem. For example, if you are experiencing a metallic taste in your mouth due to drinking tap water, simply start using filtered or bottled water instead.

However, if you have tried everything here and are still experiencing a metallic taste in your mouth, speak with your doctor about what might be causing this problem.