Is It Worth It To Buy a Water Filter?

When you’re shopping for a water filter, it can be tough to know which one is right for you. With all of the different options available, how can you be sure that you’re making the best decision?

Well, that depends on your needs and budget.

In this blog post, we’ll take a look at some of the factors you should consider when purchasing a water filter. We’ll also discuss the benefits of using a water filter and provide tips on how to choose the right one for your needs. So, if you’re interested in learning more about water filters, keep reading!

Not many people realize what is actually in their water. Water filters remove potentially dangerous contaminants from your tap water, which can otherwise pose a hazard to your health.

Here’s a quick look at some of the stuff that might be lurking in your drinking water:

Chemicals: Drinking water pollutants may include herbicides, pesticides, and insecticides. Other water pollutants include fluoride, chlorine, and disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Here’s a quick look at some of the stuff that might be lurking in your drinking water:

Bacteria: Legionella and other bacteria may live in your tap water. Even small amounts of exposure to bacteria can cause serious health conditions such as pneumonia.

Viruses: Some viruses such as hepatitis A, rotavirus, and norovirus can also live in your water. These types of viruses could lead to significant health problems including kidney failure when ingested.

Radiological contaminants: There’s a chance that heavy metals like uranium or radium could get into your drinking water from underground sources.

Heavy Metals: Lead and copper are two other metals commonly found in drinking water. They can change the taste of your water, but they’re otherwise not dangerous unless consumed over a long period of time, which makes them hard to avoid.

Insecticides: Insecticides such as DDT have been shown to increase the risk of cancer, nervous system problems, developmental issues in children, and even birth defects.

Pathogens: Pathogenic organisms give you diseases like cholera, dysentery, typhoid fever, polio, and hepatitis. These pathogens can lead to serious health conditions that require immediate attention. Some pathogens don’t cause symptoms until it’s too late; others can cause severe gastroenteritis. This bacterial illness can have symptoms including diarrhea, fever, vomiting, and stomach pain.

Germs: There are thousands of different kinds of harmful gram-negative bacteria that can survive water treatment. Even relatively small amounts of exposure to these germs could result in gastrointestinal distress or other health problems

So how do you filter out all of this stuff?

Water filters come in two types:

  • Point-of-use (POU) filters and
  • Point-of-entry (POE) systems.

POU filtration units are typically smaller appliances that fit on the faucet whereas POE systems are connected directly to your home’s water supply.

Types of water filters

Here’s a quick look at some of the most popular types of water filters.

Carbon Block Filters: Carbon block is a common type of filtration technology. It can remove bad tastes and odors, chlorine, chemicals, pesticides, and other contaminants from your drinking water. The carbon block filter may also be effective against certain types of pathogens like bacteria and cysts.

Reverse Osmosis (RO) Systems: Reverse osmosis systems are another option for filtering your tap water. They use pressure to force water through an ultra-fine membrane that only allows pure H2O molecules through while blocking other harmful materials. RO systems are typically used by homeowners to produce purified drinking water rather than to make other household items, like ice

UV Filters: These units use ultraviolet (UV) light to kill germs and bacteria in your water. They’re a fast-working system that should be able to purify drinking water very quickly. However, UV systems tend to clog easily. If you have a smaller load of tap water to filter, this unit may not be the right choice for you.

Physical Filtration Systems: Physical filtration methods, such as activated carbon or sediment filters, can also help clean up your drinking water supply. Activated charcoal is particularly good at removing chlorine from the water, but it won’t remove heavy metals or chemicals unless they sit inside of them for a long time.

Distillation Systems: These systems heat up your water until it turns into a vapor that then turns into a liquid again once cooled down. During this process, contaminants in the water get left behind while minerals and salts are condensed and end up in clean water.

The best part is that distillers can get rid of hundreds of different types of contaminants from your tap water without removing any important minerals. This makes distilled drinking water a great option for people with certain health conditions because nothing gets taken away from their cleanse.

UV Filters: UV Filters use ultraviolet (UV) light to kill germs and bacteria in your water. They’re a fast-working system that should be able to purify drinking water very quickly. However, UV systems tend to clog easily. If you have a smaller load of tap water to filter, this unit may not be the right choice for you.

Distillation Systems: These systems heat up your water until it turns into a vapor that then turns into a liquid again once cooled down. During this process, contaminants in the water get left behind while minerals and salts are condensed and end up in clean water.

The best part is that distillers can get rid of hundreds of different types of contaminants from your tap water without removing any important minerals.

This makes distilled drinking water a great option for people with certain health conditions because nothing gets taken away from their cleanse.

Chemical Filtration Systems: Chemically-enhanced filtration units can be used for a variety of household tasks, such as removing bad tastes and odors from your water. Chlorine is typically the main chemical added to tap water to help with disinfection

However, this chemical may cause bad smells or unpleasant flavors in your drinking water. A carbon filter that removes chlorine will get rid of off-putting odors and leave behind a milder taste. The only drawback is that it won’t remove any other types of contaminants like heavy metals or chemicals.

Natural Mineral Filters: These filters add beneficial minerals back into your tap water. This makes the liquid alkaline and helps balance out pH levels in your body while also making the drink smoother and easier to swallow.

Final Thoughts

It’s worth it to buy a water filter if you want cleaner, better tasting (and smelling) drinking water. However, it is not necessary.

If you cannot afford one or don’t want to put money into one, there are alternatives like boiling the water for 10 minutes.

This process will also eliminate most viruses and bacteria from your water. In order to filter properly, you need to use a filter that’s designed for the task as well as follow the directions on how to use it correctly.